If you’re like most homeowners, you’re always looking for ways to save money on home expenses. One great strategy for savings is to update your home’s insulation.

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, properly installed insulation reduces heating and cooling costs by reducing heat losses and gains. One of the most cost-effective ways to improve your home’s comfort is to add insulating materials to your attic. The best type of insulation for your home depends on factors including climate, the area to be insulated, and the R-value you hope to achieve. R-value is a measure of thermal resistance. The higher the value of R, the better the insulation’s effectiveness.

Types of Insulation Advantages
Blanket: batts and rolls Do-it-yourself, inexpensive
Loose-fill and blown-in Good for adding to existing finished areas, irregularly shaped areas, and around obstructions
Reflective system Do-it-yourself, most effective at preventing downward heat flow
Rigid fibrous or fiber insulation Can withstand high temperatures
Sprayed foam and foamed-in-place Good for adding insulation to existing finished areas and irregularly shaped areas

If you choose to install the insulation yourself, follow the manufacturer’s instructions and safety precautions carefully and check local building and fire codes.

Click here for more information and tips on choosing the right insulation material for your home.

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