Did you know there are about 100,000 thunderstorms each year in the United States? About 10% of these storms reach severe levels. A thunderstorm is classified as “severe” when it contains one or more of the following: hail one inch or greater in size, winds gusting in excess of 50 knots (57.5 mph), or a tornado. Tornados can occur in the U.S. at any time of the year, although they are most common in spring.

With spring and summer comes turbulent weather, including hurricane season. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30 and the Eastern Pacific hurricane season runs from May 15 through November 30.

Be sure you’re ready for any natural disaster by assembling a disaster supplies kit, which is a collection of basic items your household may need in the event of an emergency. Try to assemble your kit well in advance of an emergency. Click here to see a list of items to include in an emergency kit, courtesy of the American Red Cross.

Ready.gov has made it simple for you to make a family emergency plan. Download the Family Emergency Communication Plan, fill in your details, then print it and make copies for each member of your household, as well as other family members and friends who may need to reach you in an emergency.

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