The best way to achieve your goals is to get SMART about them. SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Timely. SMART goals are well-defined and built to keep you on track and accountable to yourself when trying to achieve your objective.

Specific. You have to not only state your goal, but write it down. Tell others. Just make sure you are detailed in what you want to achieve and why it is important to you.

Measurable. If your goal is to be the top loan originator this year, you will have to know how many loans you will have to close each month, quarter and year to get there.

Achievable. In order for your goal to be achievable, you should be able to articulate how you will meet your objective and make a plan to get there.

Relevant. The next step involves checking that your goal meshes with the rest of your organization’s objectives. If your goal aligns, you have a better shot at achieving it.

Timely. Give yourself – and your goal – a timeline and an end-date of when you hope to achieve success.

The SMART approach breaks your goal down into definable and actionable steps, so you can make a plan and get started. By following the SMART approach, achieving your goal is closer than you think.

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